Three Restaurants on Oahu

So one thing I haven’t talked about on my Hawaii posts is the lady who sat next to me on the plane from L.A. to Honolulu. As soon as I sat down, I was instantly her best friend. W. was my new Pilipino, Hawaiian tour guide who actually lives in Texas. During the five hour flight, she periodically would nudge me and tell me somewhere else I HAD to eat or I HAD to visit when in Hawaii. She was very funny and very sweet and really did have good recommendations. Not only did she tell me where to eat, but also what to order. And when I got to Hawaii – I ate at some of those places because they were so very good.

Anyhow here are three restaurants Tom and Marti introduced me to in Oahu.

Zippys. Zippys has several locations on the Islands. Two brothers opened the first Zippys back in 1966 (they planned to open a car wash, but it turned into a restaurant. Go figure.)

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Zippys was the place I had my first loco moco – an Hawaiian speciality.

Basically loco moco is rice, topped with a hamburger, topped with a fried egg and covered with brown gravy.

Since gravy, meat and rice are a favorite of mine, it didn’t take much for me to enjoy this.

 

 

 

 

 

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Loco moco

Another popular restaurant is The Big City Dinner (clever name). I also had loco moco here.DSC_0740.jpg

My very favorite restaurant, however, was 604. This is right off the parking lot at the Pearl Harbor Memorial. The front isn’t spectacular, but the back has beautiful views of the harbor itself. (And my Hawaiian, Pilipino friend from Texas didn’t even mention this one.)DSC_1025.jpg

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View from our table.

Here I had a seafood melt that was out-of-this-world delicious. The top was crunchy and so good! Marti and I then split a dessert – a pineapple chutney cheesecake.  We both super enjoyed it. Yes. This was my favorite.

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Pearl Harbor

I knew a little about Pearl Harbor. Like when it happened. What happened. Where it happened. But most of my World War II reading has been from the Jewish perspective, so I found visiting Pearl Harbor to be sobering and fascinating.

The two museum complexes are detailed and interesting – and give a detailed view of what happened when. After going through the museums, I felt like I had a good understanding of the event – including the fact that the planes were picked up on radar, but when reported by the servicemen who saw them on the screen, were ignored by their commanders. (Has to be a devotional there somewhere.)

At this point, you cannot go on to the memorial itself  because of an oil leak (think I have that right), but you can take a boat ride around the memorial. (The brown structure in front is part of the sunken Arizona. The memorial will be open again in March.

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On the grounds.
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Ford Island and the Nevada
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The Arizona Memorial with remains of the Arizona visible in front.
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Radar detected.
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Needs no caption.

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Some friendly people I met there!!!!!

Nuʻuanu Pali Lookout

On Sunday afternoon between church and going to another church, we headed up to Nuuanu Pali Lookout, an Hawaiian State Park. (Pali means cliff.) The lookout looks out (got that?) over the northeast coast of Oahu. Specifically over Kāneʻohe, Kāneʻohe Bay, and Kailua.

The day we were there was cloudy and rain started coming down as we took in the view which is why there are spots on the pictures. (I always am more concerned about my camera than I am me when I get caught in the rain.)

The area has a lot of history … and a lot of visitors. Even on this rainy afternoon, a lot of people were walking around, taking pictures, admiring the view, and dodging raindrops.

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The welcome sign
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I was going to crop that man hanging on to the sign, but I thought he looked kind of funny, so I left him in. Anyhow, you can see what you’re looking at by reading the sign.
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Looking straight ahead from the overlook.
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Looking to the right – here you can definitely see the rain on the lens.
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To the left.

 

Backing Up a Bit

 

Over the years, I’ve done a lot of blog posts about places I’ve visited while speaking at conferences. And I always feel kind of funny because I talk about the scenery, but not the people. That’s because it’s hard to talk about the people. I don’t have permission to post their pictures, and I don’t want to break any confidences by talking about questions they asked or challenges they have in their ministry.

And part of this trip was ministry.

The conference was at Calvary chapel, Pearl Harbor, a fairly large church located in a strip mall. I met so many friendly leaders.

And the music during the opening was appropriately Hawaiian!  Such fun.

The next morning we were able to attend the service at Hawaii Kai. (I love saying Hawaii Kai!) Good service and more friendly people.IMG_0781.jpg

In fact, afterwards, one of the men took us out to lunch at the Maona Cafe – a popular breakfast place in Hawaii Kai. He told us that there is always a wait. I had a super delicious strawberry waffle and good conversation.

 

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That afternoon we visited two Awana clubs in two different areas and once again, I had the opportunity to meet great people. (I took a lot of pictures but can’t post them because of privacy restrictions.)

But here is the Game Square for one of the churches.

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And here is Marti teaching at the other.

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Down at Your Local 7/11

Before I went to Hawaii, I did research on “ten foods you should have while visiting the islands.”

Most were listed with restaurant recommendations and sounded rather intriguing,

Then there was musubi. The descriptions said rice (good), teriyaki (ok) Spam (not good) all wrapped in seaweed (seriously?).

And instead of recommending a restaurant that had good musubi, all the sites I saw said you should get it at your local 7/11 … in the sandwich case, wrapped in saran wrap.

Unless I’m starving, I do not eat food wrapped in saran wrap from 7/11. Just not appetizing to me. At. All.

But we went to the local 7/11 and guess what? A whole display of saran-wrapped spam and seaweed!IMG_0728.jpegAnd so we bought a couple. (I told Marti I’d split one with her), and we took them back to the condo.

Guess what? I liked it. I truly, truly liked it.

So if you ever get an opportunity to eat musubi – try itDSC_0682.jpeg

Wakiki

One night we drove through Wakiki – which is a part of Honolulu best known for its beaches. But Wakiki is also an area of city lights, upscale stores – think Michigan Avenue in Chicago.

The night we drove through the area, the roads were semi-empty because some of them were blocked off for a festival. However, the sidewalks were packed with people. I mean, we kind of wondered how they could walk there were so many of them. You can’t really tell from the video because a lot of the people were back off the sidewalks a little – but one corner must’ve had 500 people standing on it.

I didn’t get a great picture since I took it out of the car window at night – but the red and blue building is the Aloha Tower which is actually a lighthouse that can be seen 15 miles from shore, an iconic symbol of Hawaii.

Some people say that like the Statue of Liberty welcomes people on the East Coast, so the Aloha Tower welcomes people into Hawaii.

The tower was built in 1926 and up into the 60s was the tallest building on the islands. Now, it is being redeveloped by the Hawaii Pacific University as a residence hall.

(Ok, interesting sidenote – Honolulu ranks seventh as US cities with most high rises.)

During World War II, the military protected the tower and in fact, painted it in camouflage colors and turned off the light so it could not be seen. Finally, in the late 40s it was sandblasted back to its original color.

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Three More Real Birds and a Fake

Three more alien birds I saw in Hawaii.

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The Pacific golden plover – known mostly for being able to fly the 4,500 miles nonstop to Alaska in 3-4 days. He is also from South Asia as are many of the birds I saw in Hawaii.
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This is a chestnut munia and at one time was the national bird of the Philippines. The bird also lives in Bangladesh, China, India and many other places.
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This cute guy is the java sparrow or Java finch. Sometimes it is a cage bird. And is from Java and Bali.

Ok, so a week in Hawaii and saw not one native bird. The one we probably had the best chance of seeing was the Nene or Hawaiian goose, but alas …

But when Tom and Marti took me to Pearl Harbor, we did see a stuffed one in the gift shop – so Tom held it up so I could take a picture. Best I could do :(.DSC_0966.jpeg