THE WANDERING DAY – PART 4

After lunch, Kelli suggested we go to Buffalo Rock State Park to see the Effigy Tumuli.

Since we were right there.

“You won’t be able to see anything,” she said, “but you can say you’ve been there and that’s enough.”

She was there before during a past April – with my brother, sister-in-law and beautiful niece  –  a day when they were able to walk around over piles of dirt that represented frog legs and catfish fins.  According to Roger’s blog, which I checked when I got home, it’s not worth going to even if you’re there.

This is a park that’s on a piece of land that used to be an island,  that used to be  the home of some Native Americans, that used to be a trading, military and missionary post, that used to be a strip mine. Most of this happened back in 1673 when Father Marquette was around.

But then in 1983, an artist was assigned to honor the Native American burial site which he did by doing five huge sculptures in the ground. He chose a snake, a turtle, catfish, frog and water strider because they’re common to the area. These are huge sculptures – hundreds of feet long.

So, now you go there to see the sculptures which are huge and dug in the ground. Which means you can’t really see them unless you’re flying over in a hang glider or something, looking down.

But to make Buffalo Rock State Park worthy of its name, there are a couple apathetic buffalo lying around.

Well, if you can’t see much in April, you see nothing in February (except for those buffalo.)

Some of the trails were closed, but we made our way to the first lookout.

This is what we see.

The 7yo and 10yo read the explanation in an attempt to figure it all out, but to no avail. But the day IS beautiful and we’re the only ones there (not that many people interested in braving the icy cold to see ancient 1983 sculptures and apathetic animals).  But we are having lots of fun and enjoying the beauty.

And this is what February wandering days are all about – wandering and doing things you don’t ordinarily do with people who are important to you.

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