Walking to Canada

So, the southern coast of Maine is breathtaking. Rocky shorelines dotted with pristine white lighthouses, quaint shops, cozy cafes … and then you drive north of the ocean and the scenery suddenly lacks shores, and lighthouses, and quaint shops.

Now instead of an ocean bordering Maine, the state is bordered by Canada.

Friend Cindy and I both had our passports, but looked at the rental car agreement and saw that we couldn’t drive our car across the border.

To get there – we’d have to walk. Now I’ve been to Canada several times, but I have not WALKED there. (However, I did walk to Mexico once.)

But how could we walk there? Only a few towns had border crossings and some of the crossings weren’t conducive to foot traffic. We asked and were directed to the town of Calais. Near the bridge was a Maine Visitor’s Center (for people coming into the U.S.) and the kind people there gave us some direction as to what to do.

By this time, a misty rain was coming down, but we were determined, so parked our car and headed for the bridge.

The actual border is mid-river (the Calais River) and we we got to stand in both countries at once.

On the other side was the town of St. Stephen, New Brunswick. We wandered down Prince William Street  looking for a place to eat. We were there in late afternoon and some of the shops were already closed, including some of the restaurants.

We finally found a pizza place (I think it was called Pizza Delight) and were seated in the back room by ourselves. Our table overlooked the river and the pizza was good and the server friendly.

Afterwards we walked back out into the rain and back to the border crossing and back to our car.

A couple 20-something guys went into Canada and came out at the same time we did, but for some reason were asked a lot more questions than we were. Guess we just looked we were who we said we were.

And that’s how we walked to Canada. Kind of fun.

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Us. Standing in the U.S. and Canada at the same time.
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How we knew we were standing in both countries.
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Looking at Canada from the U.S.
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Welcome!
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Pretty
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Where we ate.
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U.S. from Canada
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The U.S. welcome sign was not quite as colorful … wait – where IS the U.S. welcome sign?

Jordan Pond House

While enjoying a day at Acadia National Park, we decided to eat lunch at the lodge – known as Jordan Pond House. IMG_1035 2.jpeg

Jordan Pond House is in the park itself, overlooking (you guessed it – Jordan Pond). During warm weather, they put tables outside so you can eat overlooking the pond.

I read that it’s busy in the summer, but we were there in October – peak of the color season – and it was still very crowded. You can make reservations, which we didn’t know, so we registered with the host and then wandered around the gift shop waiting for our buzzer to go off. (I truly can’t remember how long – but I’m thinking 40 minutes.)

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Not a good picture, but you get the picture!!!! (Not a good sentence either.)

I did find maple sugar candy at the gift shop, which is a treat which brings back memories. Seemed like all Eastern historical sites had boxes of maple syrup candy when I was growing up, and my dad always bought me some. Now, you don’t find it quite as often, though every once in a while …

IMG_1063.jpgOnce inside the crowded restaurant, we ordered popovers and blueberry lemonade, because that’s what the restaurant is known for. Nellie McIntire started that tradition back in the 1890s – though I’m not sure who she is. Guessing she was a cook at the restaurant and not just some tourist who happened to be walking by hungry for popovers.IMG_1037.jpeg

The popover is served with strawberry jam and is delicious. The lemonade was good, too.

I also got a lobster roll, one of several I had while in Maine, don’t remember liking it as much as I liked the popover, but it was ok.

Like I said, they were busy and the people at the table next to us (maybe a foot and a half away), had finished their meal and were waiting for their bill when the server came with another round of their exact food. Somehow, he had forgotten that he already served them!

So – all that to say this. If you visit Acadia, stop at the Jordan Pond House and have a popover and some blueberry lemonade. You’ll be glad you did.

 

Shields Tavern

I have been to Williamsburg several times, but have never had the opportunity to eat in one of the taverns/restaurants on Duke of Gloucester Street. This time we decided to do it.

Shields Tavern was opened in 1705 and given the name Marot’s Ordinary. John Marot was the owner. Not only was there a place to eat, but also dry goods and a garden room. Often travelers stopped there to socialize.

Seventeen hundred and five is a long time ago. The building has gone through several renovations, but it is still on the same site and still serving food … an historical aesthetic.

We parked and walked down the street (you can’t drive on it), just as dusk was settling over the town. We were led downstairs to the basement which was lit by candlelight including a lantern at our table. Our server was in custom and very pleasant. I ordered the ale-potted beef (a delicious beef stew) because it sounded very colonial to me.

Expensive, so not a place I would go to every week, but for a once-in-a-lifetime treat, not bad. I mean, I’ve been to Williamsburg at least six times and this was the only time I got to eat on Gloucester Street. Hey! That has a nice ring to it, I could write some poetry.)

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A very old tavern – opened in 1705

 

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View from our table.
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View at our table.
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My ale potted-beef

 

M. Matsumoto Shave Ice

DSC_1039 2.jpgOne of the foods on the you-must-try-this-when-in-Hawaii lists is shave ice. (Not SHAVED ice, but shave ice.) One of the most popular places to get your shave ice is at M.Matsumoto. The place was busy

Being a person who needs my ICED tea as soon as I get up in the morning – I knew I would like this AND I did. A. Lot. Shave ice is kind of like a glorified snow cone, but not really. The ice is shaved thinner and the flavors are stronger.

And truly it’s a place not to be missed.

As we sat in the courtyard, enjoying our treat, the sun was going down in the West (Duh! Seldom does it go down in the East.) The night was beautiful and I perfectly understood the lure of the Islands.

The next day was a long flight home … in time for another conference journey – this one about as far across the country as you can get.

A great trip!

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Three Restaurants on Oahu

So one thing I haven’t talked about on my Hawaii posts is the lady who sat next to me on the plane from L.A. to Honolulu. As soon as I sat down, I was instantly her best friend. W. was my new Pilipino, Hawaiian tour guide who actually lives in Texas. During the five hour flight, she periodically would nudge me and tell me somewhere else I HAD to eat or I HAD to visit when in Hawaii. She was very funny and very sweet and really did have good recommendations. Not only did she tell me where to eat, but also what to order. And when I got to Hawaii – I ate at some of those places because they were so very good.

Anyhow here are three restaurants Tom and Marti introduced me to in Oahu.

Zippys. Zippys has several locations on the Islands. Two brothers opened the first Zippys back in 1966 (they planned to open a car wash, but it turned into a restaurant. Go figure.)

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Zippys was the place I had my first loco moco – an Hawaiian speciality.

Basically loco moco is rice, topped with a hamburger, topped with a fried egg and covered with brown gravy.

Since gravy, meat and rice are a favorite of mine, it didn’t take much for me to enjoy this.

 

 

 

 

 

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Loco moco

Another popular restaurant is The Big City Dinner (clever name). I also had loco moco here.DSC_0740.jpg

My very favorite restaurant, however, was 604. This is right off the parking lot at the Pearl Harbor Memorial. The front isn’t spectacular, but the back has beautiful views of the harbor itself. (And my Hawaiian, Pilipino friend from Texas didn’t even mention this one.)DSC_1025.jpg

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View from our table.

Here I had a seafood melt that was out-of-this-world delicious. The top was crunchy and so good! Marti and I then split a dessert – a pineapple chutney cheesecake.  We both super enjoyed it. Yes. This was my favorite.

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Down at Your Local 7/11

Before I went to Hawaii, I did research on “ten foods you should have while visiting the islands.”

Most were listed with restaurant recommendations and sounded rather intriguing,

Then there was musubi. The descriptions said rice (good), teriyaki (ok) Spam (not good) all wrapped in seaweed (seriously?).

And instead of recommending a restaurant that had good musubi, all the sites I saw said you should get it at your local 7/11 … in the sandwich case, wrapped in saran wrap.

Unless I’m starving, I do not eat food wrapped in saran wrap from 7/11. Just not appetizing to me. At. All.

But we went to the local 7/11 and guess what? A whole display of saran-wrapped spam and seaweed!IMG_0728.jpegAnd so we bought a couple. (I told Marti I’d split one with her), and we took them back to the condo.

Guess what? I liked it. I truly, truly liked it.

So if you ever get an opportunity to eat musubi – try itDSC_0682.jpeg