The Glasshouse

One of my favorite places to visit in the Historic Jamestowne part of the settlement is the Glasshouse.

Back in 1607 when Jamestowne was first established, the Glasshouse was one of the first attempts to start an industry in the New World. Everything they needed: fuel, sand, etc. was there in abundance. They just needed people who knew how to actually make the glass.

In 1608 another ship arrived and this one had eight German and Polish craftsman who knew how to make the glass and the Glasshouse was in business. But the Glasshouse was not successful, though it struggled alone for a few years.

Again in 1622, a Glasshouse was established, this time with Italian artisans. But again it failed.

Then in 1948, the furnaces were rediscovered. A new facility was constructed from the excavated ruins. Now, once again, glass is blown in Jamestowne by modern artists who make glass as they did almost 400 years ago.

Watching glassblowing has always, always fascinated me … as it did this time.

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Jamestown Settlement

Jamestown has two separate areas for visitors to enjoy.

One area is where the settlement was actually located with ruins of various buildings in a parklike area.

The second area is a settlement reproduction with replicated buildings, villagers in period customs, authentic activities such as cooking over an open fire, working on a ship and building a canoe … all making the English colony come to life.

If you’re traveling with kids, I definitely recommend the village. You can wander through the buildings, talking to the “village people,” go on the boats and if you’re lucky (like I was), be taught how to make a knot that the sailors used.

The settlement site has a lot of room to run, and is in a beautiful location right on the shore of the James River. Older kids might enjoy the history aspect of it – but I think younger kids would enjoy the village more.

And this is the truth. If I would get these posts up sooner than four months after I’ve been somewhere – I would do a much better job remembering details.

Here are some pictures of the village.

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The church
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One of the houses.
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Looking out at the village.
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The ship.
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Another ship picture
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And another
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Learning to tie a knot which I could do while he was teaching me, but could not replicate it for you now.
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Another part of the village.
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Inside
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Building a canoe – which was interesting to watch.
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Another canoe building pic.

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Youghiogheny River

img_0863We stopped to see Ken’s parents and then headed down through West Virginia and Maryland toward Virginia. We stopped at an overlook that gave us a great view of the Youghiogheny River and Reservoir. Unfortunately, the day was cloudy and our view wasn’t as good as it would’ve been on a sunny day (or even a snowy day), but it was still pretty.

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Wondering how to say Youghiogheny? Think Allegheny – that’s a start and then look it up on the Web – that’s what I did.

Later we stopped at another breathtaking overlook.

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M. Matsumoto Shave Ice

DSC_1039 2.jpgOne of the foods on the you-must-try-this-when-in-Hawaii lists is shave ice. (Not SHAVED ice, but shave ice.) One of the most popular places to get your shave ice is at M.Matsumoto. The place was busy

Being a person who needs my ICED tea as soon as I get up in the morning – I knew I would like this AND I did. A. Lot. Shave ice is kind of like a glorified snow cone, but not really. The ice is shaved thinner and the flavors are stronger.

And truly it’s a place not to be missed.

As we sat in the courtyard, enjoying our treat, the sun was going down in the West (Duh! Seldom does it go down in the East.) The night was beautiful and I perfectly understood the lure of the Islands.

The next day was a long flight home … in time for another conference journey – this one about as far across the country as you can get.

A great trip!

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Nuʻuanu Pali Lookout

On Sunday afternoon between church and going to another church, we headed up to Nuuanu Pali Lookout, an Hawaiian State Park. (Pali means cliff.) The lookout looks out (got that?) over the northeast coast of Oahu. Specifically over Kāneʻohe, Kāneʻohe Bay, and Kailua.

The day we were there was cloudy and rain started coming down as we took in the view which is why there are spots on the pictures. (I always am more concerned about my camera than I am me when I get caught in the rain.)

The area has a lot of history … and a lot of visitors. Even on this rainy afternoon, a lot of people were walking around, taking pictures, admiring the view, and dodging raindrops.

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The welcome sign
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I was going to crop that man hanging on to the sign, but I thought he looked kind of funny, so I left him in. Anyhow, you can see what you’re looking at by reading the sign.
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Looking straight ahead from the overlook.
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Looking to the right – here you can definitely see the rain on the lens.
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To the left.

 

The Resort

I remember attending a conference at DisneyWorld. The shuttle picked us up at the airport and took us right to our hotel complex. We never saw anything outside of the magical world of Mickey. Since I had been to Florida (and DisneyWorld) before, that was fine for the conference visit, but kind of limiting to someone who hadn’t been to the South.

You can do the same in Oahu. A shuttle will pick you up at the airport and deliver you to the Disney (and other hotels in the resort area) and then take you back when your stay is over.

One night we went over to the resort area and walked down to the beach. Although the resort areas are closed off  to the public – the beach is public and they have a path that you can follow to the public area.

And then we waited for another beautiful sunset.

 

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Pretty beaches

 

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The Disney Resort
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The resort –
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Sunset

But more important is the view out to sea …

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Don’t know who these people are, but they sure got cool wedding photos.

 

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A beautiful ending.

Chickens, Chickens Everywhere

DSC_0592I remember when we went to Israel, I was surprised to see cats everywhere.

Well, in Hawaii – it’s chickens or if you want to be precise – red jungle fowl.

They are everywhere – thousands of them. They crow constantly, not even waiting for dawn.

The island has had programs where police would capture the chickens, but the programs haven’t worked and they simply keep multiplying. With all the feral chickens I saw, I can’t believe this is the only picture I got and it’s not even a good one. This one was at the shrimp truck.

I think my absolute favorite sighting was when we were in the McDonald’s drive-thru line one morning – to get Egg McMuffins. Think of the resulting ad campaign they could create!!!

Oh yeah, not only chickens, but speed bumps. Everywhere! So my takeaway from Hawaii – speed bumps and roosters.